Water Pump Applications For Swimming Pools And Fish Ponds

In the past two or so articles, we discussed the topic of low water pressure-related problems among one-storey houses and two- (or multiple-) storey buildings, focusing on the different ways the problem can be solved. Here, we will turn our attention to the challenge of circulating water in swimming pools and circulating as well as aerating water in fish ponds.

First off, let us delineate between the two problems; they have plenty in common, for instance 1.] You’d probably need at least two water pumps; 2.] The siphoning or suction rate will have to be vastly reduced; and 3.] The rate of reintroduction (or pouring rate) might also have to be slowed down.

The table below expounds on the above-mentioned observations:

Similarities between Circulating Water in Swimming Pools and Circulating as well as Aerating Water in Fish Ponds

1.] At least two water pumps will probably be needed to get the job done: one that siphons water out of the pool/pond and another one that re-introduces water into the pool/pond
2.] The siphoning or suction rate will have to be reduced (as compared to home well pumps), so as:

    a.] Not to drain the pool/pond too quickly and empty it faster than refilling it

b.] To prevent accidents from happening among swimmers (in the case of swimming pools), like young or weak swimmers (i.e. kids) being sucked in by the suction force generated by the process of siphoning water from the pool. This implies that low-power jet-type water pumps should be used for this purpose

c.] To avoid destroying the fragile ecosystem of the pond (i.e. fish – both fries as well as adults – and aquatic plants get sucked in or ripped to shreds by the suction force, thereby killing them, or the fishes’ natural habitat will be irreparably damaged). This means that even lower-powered pumps (such as low-power submersible pumps) should be used for this purpose.

d.] Not to damage the point with the silt and debris sucked in

3.] The rate of reintroduction (or pouring rate) might have to also be slowed down in order to prevent the pool/pond from overflowing. This means that we can use ordinary, low-power jet-type water pumps for this task.

However, there is also some degree of uniqueness in both cases. For example, for swimming pools:

  • The siphoning or suction rate will have to be moderately reduced (i.e., when compared to well pumps) so as not to suck in or injure young swimmers (i.e. kids) or weak ones. A low-power jet-type water pump may then be used for this purpose, especially if there are budgetary constraints
  • The siphoning or suction point has to be at the lowest point of the pool, preferably at the bottom so that the suction force will not affect swimmers at the surface/top of the pool
  • Before being reintroduced into the pool, the water should be filtered and/or chemically treated in order to rid it of bacteria and parasites (such as acanthamoeba, cryptosporidium, e. coli, giardia lamblia, and pseudomonas aeruginosa, among others) as well as pollutants (sweat, urine, mucus, saliva, hair, dead skin, sebum, and faecal matter as well as sun creams, perfumes, and cosmetics). This implies the use of moderately-sophisticated water filtration equipment for this task
  • Ideally, the rate of reintroduction (or pouring rate) should slightly exceed the siphoning or suction rate so that the swimming pool’s water will continuously overflow, thereby wetting, cooling, and cleaning the floor immediately around the swimming pool. For this purpose, we could use low- to moderately-powered jet-type water jumps.

On the other hand, for fish ponds:

  • The siphoning or suction rate will have to be greatly reduced (when compared to that of the swimming pool) so as not to destroy the fragile ecosystems of the fish pond (see the comments in the earlier table).
  • The siphoning or suction point has to be at the middle of the pond, since positioning it at the top might:

a.] Suck in the fish fry (i.e., the young fish) which usually populate that area of fish ponds

b.] Suck in the algae, plankton, protozoa, and other food for young fish which are abundant at the surface/top of fish ponds, and which fish fry feast on

  • On the other hand, positioning the siphoning or suction point at the bottom of the pond might endanger the pond’s plants and bottom-feeding fishes, crustaceans, etc.
  • All of these mean that the water pump to be used in the siphoning or suction process in a fish pond should ideally be a screen-protected very low-power submersible pump
  • Additionally, a low-power submersible air pump (or several of them) should be used for aerating the fish pond, or agitating its water with air bubbles, which should help in re-oxygenating the water
  • Before being reintroduced into the pond, the water need not or should not be filtered and/or chemically treated, so that the pond’s delicate mix of plankton, protozoa, and other micro-organisms will be maintained, and so will the water’s pH level
  • Ideally, the rate of reintroduction (or pouring rate) should equal the siphoning or suction rate so that the pond’s water will not overflow, as overflowing pond water might again endanger the fish’s fry and the algae, plankton, protozoa, and other food for young fish. For this purpose, we could use even lower-powered jet-type water jumps.

The table below summarizes these individual differences (between the swimming pool and the fish pond):

If you want to Circulate water in a Swimming Pool:

Whereas if you want to Circulate and Aerate water in a Fish Pond:

1.] You’d need a low-power jet-type water pump pointed at the lowest point or bottommost part of the pool. 1a.] You’d need a very low-power submersible pump positioned at the middle part of the pond.

1b.] Additionally, you’d need one or several low-power submersible air pumps for aerating the pond.

2.] Before being reintroduced into the pool, the water should be filtered and/or chemically treated in order to rid it of bacteria and parasites as well as pollutants, and moderately-sophisticated water filtration equipment would need to be used for this task. 2.] Before being reintroduced into the pond, the water need not or should not be filtered and/or chemically treated.
3.] The rate of reintroduction (or pouring rate) should slightly exceed the siphoning or suction rate, so we should use low- to moderately-powered jet-type water pumps for this purpose. 3.] The rate of reintroduction (or pouring rate) should equal the siphoning or suction rate, so we should use even lower-powered jet-type water pumps for this task.
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